Jail Profile Survey


 


Annual Report 2002

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepared by:

 

California Board of Corrections

Facilities Standards and Operations Division

600 Bercut Drive

Sacramento CA 95814

(916) 445-5073

www.bdcorr.ca.gov



 

Table of Contents

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.. 1

INTRODUCTION.. 5

JAIL POPULATIONS AND CAPACITY.. 5

Average Daily Population (ADP) 5

ADP and Highest One-Day Population.. 6

Court-Ordered Population Caps. 8

Bookings. 8

Average Length of Stay. 10

JAIL POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS. 11

Gender 11

Felony/Misdemeanor 11

Non-Sentenced/Sentenced.. 12

Criminal/Illegal Aliens. 13

Assaults on Staff 13

Juveniles in Custody. 14

INMATE CLASSIFICATION.. 15

Security Classification.. 15

2nd and 3rd Strike Inmates. 16

Medical and Mental Health Beds. 17

CROWDING... 19

Pretrial Releases. 19

Early Releases. 20

Unserved Warrants. 20

PERSPECTIVE. 21

APPENDICES. 23

Appendix A: Jail Profile Survey Definitions. 25

Appendix B: Board Rated Capacity of Type II, III and IV Facilities. 27

 

 

 



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

The Jail Profile Survey has gathered eight years of trend data regarding a large number of jail-system variables. We now have extensive baseline information for analyzing trends. The data in this report were gathered between 1995 and the end of 2002.  Below is a capsule summary of some of the more important findings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·        The percentage of non-sentenced inmates also reached its highest level in JPS history during 2002 at 62.3%.  This percentage has been rising steadily since 1998.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2002 Jail Profile Survey data paint an ominous picture. All indications are that the California county jail system is operating at close to peak capacity at a time when economic and population trends portend increasing demands and pressures on the system.

 


JAIL PROFILE SURVEY: 2002 FINDINGS

Summary Sheet

 

Jail System Data

Average Daily Population for the year

75,156

ADP for the 4th Quarter of 2002

75,581

Current number of beds that meet the Board of Corrections Standards

73,558

Highest one day count for the year

80,677

Number of bookings in 2002

1,183,935

Percentage of males

87.5%

Percentage of non-sentenced inmates

62.3%

Percentage of felony inmates

73.1%

Percentage of inmates in maximum security housing

37.5%

Percentage of inmates who are criminal/illegal aliens

12.0%

Pre-trial inmates released due to lack of space in 2002

77,642

Sentenced inmates released early due to lack of space in 2002

74,636

Unserved felony warrants as of September in 2002

268,653

Unserved misdemeanor warrants as of September 2002

2,043,184

 

 

 



INTRODUCTION

 

This report is written annually based on data gathered by the Board of Corrections (BOC) Jail Profile Survey. The Survey collects data from all 58 counties in California, which includes 63 county and city jurisdictions operating Type II, III and IV jails. The data are gathered on a monthly or quarterly basis, depending on the availability of the data and the need to have up-to-date information.

 

This report is the eighth in the series beginning with the 1996 Annual Report that was published in the spring of 1997.

 

JAIL POPULATIONS AND CAPACITY

 

 

Average Daily Population (ADP)

 

As can be seen in Chart 1, in the first quarter of the 1996 calendar year, the ADP was slightly over 71,000. Between 1996 and 1998, the ADP rose steadily to a record high of over 80,000 inmates.


Surprisingly, the 80,000-inmate peak was short lived. Beginning in the third quarter of 1998, the ADP began a steady decline that lasted for three and a half years until the end of 2001. The long-term decline in ADP was surprising because many factors were operating that would likely cause the ADP to increase, including:

 

Despite these factors, the trend toward lower jail populations that began in 1998 has lasted almost four years. The most significant finding of this year's Jail Profile Survey Annual Report is that the long-anticipated reversal in the downward trend in ADP occurred in 2002. Between the fourth quarter of 2001 and the fourth quarter of 2002, the ADP rose by over 2,500 inmates. The ADP for 2002 was 75,156 inmates. This was the highest yearly ADP since 1999 (an ADP of 76,311), and the fourth highest yearly ADP in history.

 

Of course, four quarters is too short a time span to verify that a new trend has begun. Nevertheless, after the very regular, nearly linear decline in ADP for the fourteen quarters between mid-1998 and the end of 2001, the steady increases in the 2002 ADP represent a significant reversal. If the upward trend continues, it will have enormous implications for the California jail system.

 

One indication that the upward trend might continue is the preliminary 2002 crime counts published by the California Department of Justice, Division of Criminal Statistics. Their report compares the crime counts for the first six months of 2002 with counts for the same period in 2001, for jurisdictions with populations of 100,000 or more. The jurisdictions surveyed include police departments, sheriff's departments and contract cities (those incorporated cities that contract for law enforcement services). The findings are as follows:

 

ADP and Highest One-Day Population

 

The ADP, being an average, is a good statistic for discerning trends. One reason is that it is less sensitive to short-term or random fluctuations than daily data would be. Using averages to analyze trends makes it less likely to "over interpret" short term or random variations in the data.

 

However, as a statistical index, the average also has its limitations. Because it represents the middle of the distribution of the daily population totals for the quarter, the average does not indicate how high the jail population is on peak-population days. To the extent that on a peak-population day, the jail population is significantly higher than the average-population number, the average is a poor indicator of the need for jail space.

 

Chart 2 illustrates the difference between the ADP and the "Highest One Day" state jail population for the four quarters of 2002. Across the four quarters, the Highest One Day exceeds the ADP by an average of 4,792 inmates (6.4% above the ADP).


In order to have sufficient beds to accommodate peak demands, the local county jail system should exceed 80,000 beds. In addition, jail administrators need a number of unoccupied beds (estimated to be between five and ten percent of the Board Rated Capacity of a jurisdiction) at any given time for effective jail management. Some undesignated space is required for administrative segregation, to make room for inmates needing special protection, to manage racial and other conflicts, and to deal with inmates with special mental health and medical needs.

 


Assuming the jail capacity should exceed the ADP (for both peak demands and effective jail management) by ten percent, the current bed-capacity-need would  be 82,672.

 

Chart 3 on the following page indicates that current statewide BRC (Board Rated Capacity; the number of beds that meet the Board of Corrections jail standards) is 73,558 beds. On the average day in 2002, the demand for beds exceeded the capacity by 1,598. On the day of peak population, the demand for beds exceeded the capacity by 7,119. The desirable number of beds to effectively manage the statewide jail system exceeded the capacity by 9,114 .

 

These numbers suggest an ominous deficiency in jail capacity, especially given the possibility that we are at the beginning of a new trend toward higher jail populations. To compound the problem, there are currently no significant plans on the drawing boards for additional jail space.


Court-Ordered Population Caps

 


Another factor that affects jail capacity is court-ordered population caps. According to the Jail Profile Survey, of the current 63 jurisdictions, 26 have court-ordered population caps. Those 26 jurisdictions operate 71 facilities of which 57 have population caps. The 57 facilities with population caps house 64.4% of the State's ADP.

 

If the jail population continues to grow, having population caps in jurisdictions that currently account for two thirds of the total jail population, statewide, will severely limit the options available for dealing with the increased demand for jail space.

 

Bookings

 

"Bookings" refers to the total number of people who are admitted to county Type II, III, and IV facilities. In 1996 (the first full year of Jail Profile Survey operation), the average number of bookings per month was 101,942. In 2002, the average number of bookings per month was 98,661. During the 1996-2002 span of time, the highest recorded number of bookings per month was 101,952 and the lowest was 97,010 (a difference of 4,934 or about a 5% variation from the highest to lowest value). This is a fairly narrow range considering that during the same period, the ADP varied by more than 10% (72,007 to 79,143).

 

Chart 4 illustrates the pattern in bookings starting with 1996. One might assume that the increase in the ADP in 2002 could have been predicted by a prior increase in bookings. This was not the case, however. The bookings for 2002 were higher than 2001 results, but lower than in 2000. If the rise in the ADP is not directly related to a commensurate increase in bookings, what is the relationship between the number of bookings and the ADP?


So far, we haven't been able to find a statistical relationship. Regardless of whether we look at monthly, quarterly, or yearly data, the size of the statistical relationship between the number of bookings and the ADP hovers around zero.

We explored the possibility that a time lag was necessary for any change in bookings to eventually result in a proportional change in the ADP. Statistical analyses did not support this hypothesis. Allowing for a time lag between a change in the number of bookings and an eventual change in the ADP did not increase the size of the relationship between bookings and ADP.

 


Chart 5 shows the average number of bookings per month across the three months in the quarters, from the first quarter of 1966 to the final quarter of 2002. The quarterly data show the important result that the January to March and October to December quarters produce a substantially lower number of bookings than do the April to June and July to September quarters. While this is not a surprising finding, it is important to take into account when comparing booking results from one time period to another.

 


Overall, the current results indicate that the number of bookings has been in a slight decline since 1996.


Average Length of Stay

 


One factor that has a direct effect on ADP is the average length of stay (ALS) associated with the average inmate.  Very similar to the ADP, the ALS increased between 1986 and 1998.  The ALS then decreased slightly until 2000, where it has hovered around 23 days since, with only a minimal increase in 2001. Time will tell if this increase foretells the beginning of a new upward trend in the length of stay.

 


It is difficult to get a good measure of length of stay. Between 1995 and 2001, we had computed the ALS in the following manner:

1.      The "bed days" per year equals the ADP for the year times the number of days in the year.

2.      Total number of bookings for the year equals the average bookings per month times 12.

3.      ALS equals the number of bed days divided by the number of bookings.

 

While this method has provided a reliable way of comparing one year to the next, it is difficult to determine the accuracy of the length-of-stay estimate. One reason is that there were inconsistencies among jurisdictions regarding the minimum length of time after being booked that a person had to remain in jail in order to be included in the booking totals; i.e., some jurisdictions require that a full 24 hours or more transpire, while others require significantly less time. Given the computational formula for ALS and the fact that the number of bookings did not change markedly during the period of 1996 to 2001, the ALS and the ADP charts would look fairly similar.

 

To address this issue, we began to collect a new type of ALS data in 2002. Jurisdictions submit to the BOC the quarterly average length of stay of all inmates who were released during the quarter in question. Currently, the data are not yet complete enough, or reliable enough, to publish. However, using a sample of the data, it appears that the old and new computational procedures may produce very similar results (i.e., an ALS of between 22 and 24 days per inmate).


JAIL POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS

 

Gender

 

In 2002, the majority of inmates in jails in California were males (87.5% males versus 12.5% females). Those percentages have changed slightly since 1996, when males and females constituted 88.2% and 11.8% of the jail population respectively. Women currently constitute a higher percent of the jail population than they did six years ago.

 

Since 1996, the ADP has increased by 3,149 inmates. Males constitute 71.1% of the increase (2,239), and females constitute 28.9% (910). Over that time span, the male population in jails has increased by 3.5%, and the female population has increased by 11%.

 


If the female population in jails continues to grow at a disproportionate rate, the implications for jail design, costs, programming and management will be significant.

 


Felony/Misdemeanor

 

The seriousness of the offenses with which inmates are charged has a tremendous effect on jail operations and costs (with the costs increasing commensurate to the seriousness of the offenses). This is exactly what has been happening since the advent of the Jail Profile Survey.  The percentage of inmates that were charged with felony offenses was 68.4% in 1995, the first year of the Jail Profile Survey; in 2002, the percentage was 73.1%.


For the eight years we have been gathering Jail Profile Survey data, the percent of felony inmates has risen an average of about .7% per year (projected to be about five percent per decade). If this trend were to continue, within 10 years, felony inmates will constitute over 80% of the ADP.

 


Non-Sentenced/Sentenced

 


One of the most important 2002 Jail Profile Survey findings is the rapid increase in the percentage of non-sentenced inmates. This is an important statistic because inmates who are non-sentenced are typically assigned higher levels of security and require enhanced resources due to court appearances, uncertainty of adjudication and behavior, and the need for interaction with legal advisors.  When jail managers design procedures and programs for facility safety, the percentage of inmates who are non-sentenced is a key factor.

In the 1980's, sentenced and non-sentenced inmates were evenly distributed in the jails’ ADP.  By 1995, however, the percentage of non-sentenced inmates increased to 58.9% of the ADP.  The percentage dropped to 57.2% in 1998, and then began a steady rise to its 2002 level of 62.3%. Given a fixed number of BRC beds, the more beds needed for non-sentenced inmates results in fewer beds available for sentenced inmates. Obviously, if this trend were to continue, it would eventually create a problem of providing sufficient jail space for sentenced inmates.

 

Criminal/Illegal Aliens

 


The number of criminal/illegal aliens in California jails has been increasing since 1996 (from 7,054 in 1996 to 9,658 in 2001). However, in 2002 this growth trend ended. The 2002 number of criminal/illegal aliens (8,977) reverted to about the 1998 level.

Despite this downturn, the percentage of criminal/illegal aliens in California jails remains quite high at 12% of the total ADP.

 

Housing criminal/illegal aliens in California jails adds 14% to what would otherwise be the total ADP.  In construction alone, the construction costs associated with bed-space to house criminal/illegal aliens has cost the State over a half-billion dollars.

 

The State has been trying to recoup the costs of housing criminal/illegal aliens from the federal government. The rationale for this effort is that individuals in this country illegally are in violation of federal laws and, therefore, the federal government should bear the cost of their incarceration.

 

Assaults on Staff

 

Violence on the part of inmates toward jail staff is always a concern. The level of concern was increased when the Three Strikes law was passed. The fear was that inmates with two or three Strikes would have less to lose, and would therefore be more prone to be violent toward the staff.  Partially as a result of this concern, but also to measure trends in the amount of violence directed toward jail personnel, Assaults on Staff was an important variable added to the original Jail Profile Survey.

 


Chart 11 presents the data we have collected to date. As might be expected, the pattern of the number of assaults over time looks very similar to the ADP trend. Nevertheless, between 2001 and 2002, the average number of assaults per quarter increased from 206 to 264 (a 28% increase) while the ADP increased by only 1.8%.

 


Juveniles in Custody

 


Chart 12 illustrates the number of juveniles in custody since 1995.  The number of juveniles in custody has not increased as expected. In fact, the number in 2002 is actually lower than in 1995. Of course, housing juveniles in jail facilities that were designed for, and are currently housing, adults presents enormous problems.  Fortunately, the anticipated influx of juveniles into the adult jail system has not materialized.  One possible reason for this could be the recent statewide increase in the construction of new juvenile hall beds.

 



INMATE CLASSIFICATION

 

Security Classification

 


The relative proportion of inmates housed in the three security-housing levels has a tremendous impact on a wide variety of jail construction and management variables.  Maximum-security housing is the most expensive to build and to manage. 

 


The percentage of inmates in minimum-security housing has remained fairly constant since 1995 and is currently 25.2%. Unexpectedly, since 1995, the percentage of inmates in medium-security housing increased from 21.0% to 37.3% and the percentage in maximum-security housing decreased from 53.5% to 37.5%. We investigated the reason for this trend and found that it was due primarily to one large agency that has been adjusting its inmate classification system. This agency concluded that many inmates had been incorrectly classified as requiring maximum-security housing and were re-classified to medium security.

 

The implications of the above for the Jail Profile Survey are as follows:

1.      The apparent trend toward a lower percentage of inmates requiring maximum-security housing was simply an artifact of an agency changing its classification system.

2.      We will use the 2002 results as the new baseline for the analysis of trends (37.5% maximum security, 37.3% medium security, and 25.2% minimum security).

 

The results show that, due to the high percentage of non-sentenced, felony inmates, and the general "worsening" of the inmate population, a sizable percentage of inmates currently require maximum security housing in jails.

 

2nd and 3rd Strike Inmates

 

The number of 2nd Strike inmates in California jails was estimated to be 2,636 when we began to gather these data shortly after the Three Strikes law was enacted.  The expectation at the time was that the number of 2nd Strike inmates would continue to rise. This expectation was partially the result of the finding that the length of incarceration for inmates with two and three Strikes was much longer than average.

 

Contrary to this expectation, the number of inmates with two Strikes began to decline in 1997, as can be seen in Chart 14.   The ADP of inmates with two Strikes in 2002 was 1,493 (about twelve hundred inmates fewer than seven years ago).  The results for inmates with three Strikes are somewhat different in that the number has not consistently declined. Nevertheless, the number of 3rd Strike inmates was higher in 1995 than in 2002 (3,794 versus 3,334 respectively).

 


It is interesting that the number of 2nd Strike inmates declined by 43% while the 3rd Strike inmates declined by 12%. Why would there be such a large difference? We need to gather more data to answer the question. One simple explanation is that the Three Strikes law is working as intended. Offenders are being deterred from behaving in a manner that would result in a second Strike.

In the meantime, the Three Strike numbers are comprised of those chronic offenders not deterred by Three Strikes (there will probably always be a small, but relatively stable, percentage of these people in the general population), and those individuals who already had two prior serious or violent offenses prior to the passage of the Three Strikes law (and who continue to offend) gradually being arrested and incarcerated. If this possibility proves to be correct, we would expect the ADP of Three Strike inmates to settle down to a small, but predictable, percentage of the California general population.

 

Medical and Mental Health Beds

 

When the ADP was 72,007 in 1996, the number of inmates in medical beds was 930, or about 1.29% of the ADP.  In 2002, the ADP was 75,156 and the number of inmates in medical beds was 962 or about 1.27%. The percentage of the ADP that is housed in medical beds has remained stable since 1995.

 

As can be seen in Chart 16, the findings for mental health beds have been quite different. Since 1996, the number of inmates in mental health beds has risen from 1,331 to 3,731 (a 280 percent increase). In 1996, 1.8% of the ADP was housed in mental health beds. In 2002, the percentage was 5.0%. Without an adequate mental health system to provide care for those who lack resources, the State of California has increasingly relied on the local jail system to provide shelter for people whose mental illness-related behavior results in their being arrested and incarcerated. Some now suggest that the local jail system has become the world's largest mental health system.


 


To get more detailed information regarding the impact of mentally ill offenders on jails, we added three new variables to the Jail Profile Survey in 2002:

  1. The average number of new mental health case files opened each month in 2002 was 9,785 (13% of the ADP).
  2. The average number of mental case files that remained open at the end of the month in 2002 was 18,058 (24% of the ADP).
  3. The average number of inmates on psychotropic medication each month in 2002 was 8,282 (11% of the ADP).

 

As we gain more experience with these data, we will report our findings in future.

 

The cost of incarcerating the mentally ill has become enormous. In addition to basic shelter and care, the amount that the jail system spends for psychotropic medication and the associated mental health services has become substantial.


CROWDING

 

Does the local jail system have the capacity: 1) to house all those who, by virtue of their offenses, and the circumstances surrounding their arrests, would normally be held in jail awaiting trial, and 2) to house all convicted individuals until they have completed their sentences? The answer is, "No."  Each month in California, a significant number of people are not incarcerated, or are released early from their sentences, due solely to the lack of adequate jail space.

 

Pretrial Releases

 


As can be seen in Chart 17, on average in 2002, close to 6,500 individuals per month, who would normally have been incarcerated if jail space were available, avoided incarceration due to lack of space. Although the average has bounced around during the history of the Jail Profile Survey, it steadily declined between 1997 and 2000. However, the number increased by about 10% in 2001, and by another 33% in 2002 (partially due to the increase in the 2002 ADP).

If the 6,470 individuals per month were, in fact, incarcerated, and assuming their average length of stay were the same as for the current State average, the total ADP for 2002 would have been 81,630 (the highest in history by over 2,000 inmates).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Releases

 


Due to the lack of available jail space between 1995 and 2000, in excess of 10,000 individuals each month were released early and did not complete their sentences. As shown in Chart 18, the number has been declining since its peak in 1996. Nevertheless, in 2002, the number still was in excess of 6,000 per month.  With the ADP on the increase, it is likely that the number of individuals released early will increase as well.

If the 6,470 pretrial releases did not occur and the 6,220 individuals released early per month were required to serve out their sentences, the ADP would increase instantly to almost 88,000 inmates.

 

An ADP of 88,000 inmates would exceed the current capacity by over 14,000 beds. On a day of peak demand for space, the jail population would be estimated to be over 93,000 inmates. This total would exceed the current jail-system capacity by about 20,000 beds. At an average cost of about $50,000 per bed, it would take 1 billion dollars to construct a jail system capable of handling the current demand for jail space.

 

Unserved Warrants

 

The lack of jail space discussed above is probably even more critical than it appears. There are currently over quarter of a million unserved felony warrants and over two million unserved misdemeanor warrants in California.

 

If all the warrants were somehow served at once, and 3.3% of them resulted in a person going to jail for the average length of stay, the ADP would suddenly double to 150,000 inmates.

 


PERSPECTIVE

 

When the massive jail-construction program of the 1980’s and early 1990’s was completed, the number of jail beds on-line was approximately 71,000. In 1995, the newly implemented Jail Profile Survey estimated the ADP to be approximately 71,000. In other words, by the mid-1990’s all available jail beds were in use.

 

That was an ominous conclusion, given that the State had just finished significantly enhancing the State’s jail capacity, and the prospects for funds for additional construction were very limited.

 

The situation became even bleaker as the Jail Profile Survey began to yield a more complete picture of the existing pressures on the State’s jail system. Aspects of this picture include:

·        Over 6,000  people per month arrested, but not incarcerated, solely due to lack of jail space.

·        Over 6,000 people per month given early releases from their sentences because bed space was needed to house “more serious” offenders.

·        An average population of over 3,000 (and rising) mentally ill individuals who require specially designed housing and special services.

·        The percentage of female inmates is rising.

·        The percentage of inmates charged with felony offenses is rising.

·        The percentage of non-sentenced inmates is rising.

·        There are typically over a quarter of a million unserved felony warrants in California.

·        The California economy is currently in such a troubled condition that many local jurisdictions are finding it difficult to provide the resources to fully staff and operate all their jail facilities. Some facilities have already been closed for this reason, and more may close in the near future.

·        The general population of California continues to rise at a small, but steady, rate each year. If the percentage of offenders in the general population remains the same, then the number of people who will require incarceration in the future will rise commensurately.

 

Despite all these factors, the ADP peaked at around 80,000 inmates in 1998, and then steadily declined to around 72,000 inmates in 2001. Presumably, local jurisdictions were dealing with the pressures toward jail-population growth in any reasonable way they could (such as with pretrial and early releases).

 

The upturn in the ADP in 2002 is significant for a number of reasons. The most troubling reason would be that all reasonable efforts to keep jail populations within the limits of jail-system capacity have been exhausted. If this speculation turns out to be the case, we expect that jails populations will continue to rise at a steady pace in 2003 and beyond.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendices


 

 

 

 


Appendix A: Jail Profile Survey Definitions

 

·        Average Daily Population (ADP):  the average daily number of inmates in county jails (with the daily totals averaged across the month).  The number includes inmates housed in single cells, double cells, dormitories (multiple occupancy cells), handicapped housing, disciplinary segregation, and administrative segregation.  The values reported are based upon each facility’s “early morning” count.

 

·        Average Length of Stay (ALS):  the statewide average length of time that inmates were incarcerated during the reporting period.

 

·        Board Rated Capacity (BRC):  the number of beds in the system that meet the standards of the Board of Corrections.

 

·        Bookings:  the statewide total of non-sentenced and sentenced persons booked per month into Type II, III, and IV facilities.

 

·        Criminal/Illegal Aliens:  each county provides an estimate each quarter of the number of illegal/criminal aliens in their facilities. 

 

·        Early Releases:  the statewide number of inmates who were given pretrial releases or sentenced inmates who were released early due to lack of jail space.

 

·        Highest One-Day Count:  the sum of each jurisdiction’s highest one-day count during the reporting period.  This highest one-day count probably falls on a different date in each of the jurisdictions.  However, the total is an accurate indicator of the statewide capacity needs.

 

·        Inmate Population by Charging Offense:  the statewide number of inmates charged with felony offenses and the number charged with misdemeanor offenses.

 

·        Inmate Population by Classification:  the number of inmates housed in maximum, medium and minimum-security housing.

 

·        Number of Inmates Receiving Psychotropic Medication:  Those inmates taking prescription medication that influences emotions or behavior.

 

·        Open Mental Health Case:  Those inmates identified as having a psychological disorder and are actively in need of and receiving mental health services.

 

·        Percentage of Non-Sentenced Inmates:  the statewide percentage of the ADP, which is comprised of inmates who have not yet been adjudicated.

 

·        Second and Third Strike Inmates:  the statewide number of inmates who have been charged with their second or third strike (Section 667 of the California Penal Code).

 

·        Type I Facility:  a local detention facility used for the detention of persons for not more than 96 hours excluding holidays after booking. Such a Type I facility may also detain persons on court order either for their own safekeeping or sentenced to a city jail as an inmate worker, and may house inmate workers sentenced to the county jail provided such placement in the facility is made on a voluntary basis on the part of the inmate.

 

·        Type II Facility:  a local detention facility used for the detention of persons pending arraignment, during trial, and upon a sentence of commitment.

 

·        Type III Facility:  a local detention facility used only for the detention of convicted and sentenced persons.

 

·        Type IV Facility:  a local detention facility or portion thereof designated for the housing of inmates eligible under Penal Code Section 1208 for work/education furlough and/or other programs involving inmate access into the community.

 

·        Unserved Warrants:  the statewide number of unserved felony and misdemeanor warrants.


 

 

Appendix B: Board Rated Capacity of Type II, III and IV Facilities

 

County

BOC #

Facility

Type

BRC

Alameda

20

Glenn E. Dyer

II

              858

 

65

Santa Rita Jail

II

           3,601

 

100

Alameda Comm. Re-Entry Center

IV

              214

 

220

Oakland City Jail

II

              218

 

 

Total BRC

 

          4,891

Amador

320

Amador County Jail

II

                76

 

 

Total BRC

 

               76

Butte

340

Butte County Jail

II

              612

 

 

Total BRC

 

             612

Calaveras

400

Calaveras County Jail

II

                65

 

 

Total BRC

 

               65

Colusa

420

Colusa County Jail

II

                92

 

 

Total BRC

 

               92

Contra Costa

440

Martinez Detention Facility

II

              531

 

460

Marsh Creek Detention Facility

III

              256

 

470

West County Detention Facility

II

              864

 

 

Total BRC

 

          1,651

Del Norte

640

Del Norte County Jail

II

              133

 

 

Total BRC

 

         133

El Dorado

670

El Dorado County Jail

II

              243

 

680

South Lake Tahoe Jail

II

              126

 

 

Total BRC

 

         369

Fresno

700

Fresno South Annex Jail

II

              528

 

702

Fresno North Annex Jail

II

              288

 

705

Fresno County Main Jail

II

           1,064

 

710

Fresno Co Satellite Jail

III

                96

 

 

Total BRC

 

      1,976

Glenn

850

Glenn Co Adult Detention Facility

II

              122

 

 

Total BRC

 

         122

Humboldt

860

Humboldt County Correctional Facility

II

              411

 

 

Total BRC

 

         411

Imperial

880

Imperial County Detention Facility

II

              230

 

900

Herbert Hughes Correctional Center

II

              162

 

 

Total BRC

 

         392

Inyo

985

Inyo County Jail

II

                96

 

 

Total BRC

 

           96

Kern

1000

Central Receiving Facility

II

              292

 

1010

Lerdo Pretrial Facility

II

           1,232

 

1020

Lerdo Maximum

II

              374

 

1040

Lerdo Minimum Facility

III

              800

 

 

Total BRC

 

      2,698

Kings

1140

Kings County Jail

II

              141

 

1150

Kings County Branch Jail

II

              155

 

 

Total BRC

 

         296

Lake

1265

Lake County Jail- Hill Road Facility

II

              244

 

 

Total BRC

 

         244

Lassen

1305

Adult Detention Facility

II

              149

 

 

Total BRC

 

         149

Los Angeles

1320

LA Central Jail

IIJ

           5,236

 

1325

LA Twin Towers Correctional Facility

IIJ

           2,628

 

1340

LA Biscailuz Recovery Center

III

              144

 

1395

LA North County Correctional Facility

II

           2,208

 

1400

LA Pitchess East Facility

II

              926

 

1410

LA Pitchess South Facility

II

              910

 

1415

LA Pitchess North Facility

II

              768

 

1445

LA Century Regional Detention Facility

II

           1,588

 

2975

Scapular House

IV

              232

 

 

Total BRC

 

    14,640

Madera

2985

Madera Adult Correctional Facility

II

              316

 

 

Total BRC

 

         316

Marin

3010

Marin County Jail

II

              329

 

 

Total BRC

 

         329

Mariposa

3090

Mariposa Co. Adult Detention Facility

II

                58

 

 

Total BRC

 

          58

Mendocino

3100

Mendocino Adult Detention Facility

II

              296

 

 

Total BRC

 

         296

Merced

3160

Merced County Jail

II

              190

 

3190

Merced Correctional Facility

II

              508

 

 

Total BRC

 

         698

Modoc

3220

Modoc County Jail

II

                43

 

 

Total BRC

 

           43

Mono

3250

Mono County Jail

II

                44

 

 

Total BRC

 

           44

Monterey

3280

Monterey County Jail

II

              563

 

3300

Monterey County Rehabilitation

II

              250

 

 

Total BRC

 

         813

Napa

3400

Napa County Jail

IIJ

              253

 

 

Total BRC

 

         253

Nevada

3455

Wayne Brown Detention Center

II

              223

 

 

Total BRC

 

         223

Orange

3480

Orange County Men’s Jail

IIJ

           1,219

 

3490

Intake Release Center

II

              406

 

3500

Orange County Women's Jail

II

              275

 

3520

James A. Musick Facilities

II

              713

 

3560

Theo Lacy

II

           1,902

 

3765

Santa Ana Police Facility

IIJ

              224

 

 

Total BRC

 

      4,739

Placer

3780

Placer County Main Jail

II

             472

 

3805

Placer County Minimum Security

II

              160

 

 

Total BRC

 

632

Plumas

3880

Plumas County Jail

II

                67

 

 

Total BRC

 

           67

Riverside

3910

Robert Presley Detention Ctr.

II

              994

 

3920

Banning Correctional Facility

II

              634

 

3930

Southwest Detention Center

II

           1,063

 

3940

Blythe Jail

II

                79

 

3960

Indio Jail

II

              237

 

 

Total BRC

 

      3,007

Sacramento

4070

Sacramento County Main Jail

II

           2,380

 

4080

Rio Cosumnes Correctional Ctr.

II

           1,505

 

 

Total BRC

 

      3,885

San Benito

4205

San Benito Adult Detention

II

              124

 

 

Total BRC

 

         124

San Bernardino

4220

San Bernardino Detention Center

II

              740

 

4280

San Bernardino Co-Glen Helen

III

              964

 

4362

West Valley Detention Center

II

           3,072

 

 

Total BRC

 

      4,776

San Diego

4381

San Diego Central Jail

II

              944

 

4400

Las Colinas Women’s Detention

II

              400

 

4420

South Bay Regional Facility Chula Vista

II

              390

 

4430

George Bailey Detention Facility

II

           1,373

 

4435

East Mesa Detention Facility

III

              344

 

4436

East Mesa Private Jail

II

           1,016

 

4440

Vista Facility

II

              820

 

4480

Descanso Detention Facility

III

              225

 

4600

San Diego County Work Furlough

IV

              128

 

 

Total BRC

 

      5,640

San Francisco

4620

San Francisco County Jail #1

II

              426

 

4630

San Francisco County Jail #8

II

              392

 

4640

San Francisco County Jail #2

II

              398

 

4660

San Francisco County Jail #3

II

              552

 

4670

San Francisco County Jail #7

II

              372

 

 

Total BRC

 

      2,140

San Joaquin

4710

John J. Zunino Facility

II

              708

 

4720

San Joaquin County Honor Farm

II

              582

 

 

Total BRC

 

      1,290

San Luis Obispo

4800

San Luis Obispo County Jail

IIJ

              394

 

4801

San Luis Obispo Honor Farm

III

                63

 

 

Total BRC

 

         457

San Mateo

4880

San Mateo Men's Weekend Facility

III

                16

 

4885

Women’s Honor Camp

III

                30

 

4890

Women’s Correctional Center

II

                83

 

4900

Men’s Correctional Center

III

              260

 

4910

Maguire Facility

II

              688

 

 

Total BRC

 

      1,077

Santa Barbara

5000

Santa Barbara County Main Jail

II

              618

 

5020

Santa Barbara Honor Farm

III

              161

 

 

Total BRC

 

         779

Santa Clara

5120

Santa Clara County Main Jail

IIJ

           1,157

 

5140

Elmwood Rehabilitation Center

II

           1,956

 

5180

Women's Correctional Ctr. (Elmwood)

II

              516

 

5185

Women's Residential Center

IV

                56

 

5210

Mt View Work Furlough Facility

IV

              285

 

 

Total BRC

 

      3,970

Santa Cruz

5280

Santa Cruz County Jail

II

              311

 

5300

Santa Cruz Rountreelane Minimum

III

              162

 

5310

Santa Cruz Medium Security

III

                96

 

5320

Santa Cruz Blaine Women’s Minimum

III

                32

 

 

Total BRC

 

         601

Shasta

5360

Shasta County Main Jail

II

              381

 

 

Total BRC

 

381

Sierra

5440

Sierra County Jail

II

                14

 

 

Total BRC

 

           14

Siskiyou

5461

Siskiyou County Jail

II

                90

 

 

 

 

           90

Solano

5480

Claybank Facility

II

              379

 

5510

Solano County Justice Center

II

              705

 

 

Total BRC

 

      1,084

Sonoma

5641

Sonoma Main Adult Detention

II

              696

 

5660

Sonoma-North County Facility

II

              533

 

 

Total BRC

 

      1,229

Stanislaus

5720

Stanislaus County Main Jail

II

              318

 

5730

Stanislaus County Public Safety Center

II

              602

 

5740

Stanislaus County Honor Farm

II

              210

 

 

Total BRC

 

      1,130

Sutter

5780

Sutter County Jail

II

              352

 

 

Total BRC

 

352

Tehama

5800

Tehama County Jail

II

              179

 

 

Total BRC

 

         179

Trinity

5820

Trinity Co. Detention Facility

II

                53

 

 

Total BRC

 

          53

Tulare

5840

Tulare County Jail

II

              264

 

5850

Bob Wiley Detention Facility

II

              674

 

5865

Men's Correctional Facility

II

              302

 

 

Total BRC

 

1240

Tuolumne

5940

Tuolumne County Jail

II

              149

 

 

Total BRC

 

         149

Ventura

5960

Ventura County Main Jail

II

              412

 

6000

Ventura Ojai Women's Facility

II

              248

 

6030

Ventura Co Work Furlough

IV

              235

 

6045

Todd Road Jail

II

              782

 

 

Total BRC

 

      1,677

Yolo

6090

Monroe Detention Center

II

              272

 

6095

Leinberger Center

II

              120

 

 

Total BRC

 

         392

Yuba

6120

Yuba County Jail

II

              418

 

 

Total BRC

 

         418

Statewide BRC

 

73,558