Juvenile Detention

Profile Survey

Annual Report 2002

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepared By:

 

California Board of Corrections

Facilities Standards and Operations Division

600 Bercut Drive

Sacramento California  95814

(916) 445-5073

www.bdcorr.ca.gov


Table of Contents

 

Executive Summary. 3

Introduction.. 4

Population and Facility Occupancy. 5

Average Daily Population (ADP) 5

Facility ADP. 6

Juvenile Halls 6

Camps 7

Juveniles in Other Detention Settings 7

Facility Capacity and Need. 8

Average Length of Stay. 9

Juvenile Hall Bookings 10

Detainee Characteristics, Mental Health and Behavioral Issues. 13

Distribution of Charges 13

Detention Disposition. 14

Gender of Juveniles in Custody. 15

Age Distribution. 15

Critical Identifiers 16

Mental Health Items 17

Suicide Attempts 19

Assaults on Staff 20

Escapes 20

Perspective. 21

Appendices. 23

 


Executive Summary

 

The Board of Corrections (BOC) began collecting data from county juvenile detention facilities via the Juvenile Detention Profile Survey (JDPS) in 1999.  The JDPS currently collects data from 128 juvenile detention facilities in 54 jurisdictions on a monthly and quarterly basis.

 

The following is a snapshot of significant findings for 2002:

 

l        The total average daily population (ADP) for all local juvenile detention options was (i.e., juveniles halls, camps, and home detention) 13,659.

 

l        The ADP for juvenile halls and camps was 11,128.  The average Board Rated Capacity (BRC), or beds that meet Title 15 and 24 minimum standards, was 12,497.

 

l        The ADP for juvenile halls was 6,580; the average BRC was 7,126.  The highest one-day population, however, reached 7,274, which is 11% greater than the ADP and 2% greater than the BRC. 

 

l        The ADP for camps was 4,547; the average BRC for camps was 5,371.

 

l        An average of 2,531 juveniles, or 19% of the total number of juveniles detained, were in “other detention settings.” 

 

l        There were over 118,000 bookings into juvenile halls during 2002, which is equivalent to an average of 323 bookings each day.

 

l        Depending on the computational procedure, the average length of stay in juvenile halls was estimated to be between 20.0 and 22.6 days.

 

l        64% of the juveniles booked into juvenile hall, and 67% of the juveniles committed to camps, were charged with a felony.

 

l        82% of the ADP in juvenile halls, and 90% of the population in camps, was male.  The percentage of males in both juvenile halls and camps has been decreasing since the inception of the JDPS.

 

l        75% of juveniles in detention facilities were between 15 and 17 years of age.


Introduction

 

The Board of Corrections (BOC) implemented the Juvenile Detention Profile Survey (JDPS) in January 1999 as an instrument to provide state and local decision makers with timely and comprehensive information about the changing population – and needs – of local juvenile detention facilities.  Through collaboration with local partners, primarily county probation departments, the BOC developed a survey instrument for capturing data that are critical to strategic planning related to facility design, detention programming and resource distribution in juvenile detention systems.

 

One of the primary objectives of the JDPS is to track the population level in California’s local juvenile detention facilities.  In addition to gathering statistics on the average daily population and highest one-day count in these facilities, the JDPS collects data on the use of different non-facility-based custody options.  The JDPS also gathers data on the characteristics of detained juveniles that are critical in making decisions about what programs to provide and where to allocate resources (e.g., gender, age, type of offense, disposition and mental health needs).

 

During 2002, each county probation department that operated a detention facility submitted both monthly and quarterly data to the BOC.  The monthly survey requests facility or placement-specific data on gender, offense, disposition status and daily population.  This form also gathers county-level data on detainees’ mental health issues, early releases and the number of certain types of bookings.  The quarterly survey gathers county-level data on detained juveniles by certain identifiers (e.g., awaiting placement or transport, suspected criminal illegal alien and remand to adult court), age distributions in halls and camps, average length of stay, incidence of assault, escapes and attempted or completed suicides.  The BOC aggregates all data and reports findings on a quarterly basis.  The averages for the data in this report are averages of the four quarters of data that were reported during 2002.[1]

 

The BOC continues to incrementally improve the quality of the data by ensuring that administrators of local juvenile detention systems remain involved in the refinement of the survey process, which is now in its fourth full year of operation.  Because trends become more apparent over time, the JDPS will enable the BOC to continue providing key decision makers with information that is critical to planning for future juvenile detention needs. 

Population and Facility Occupancy

 

Average Daily Population (ADP)

 

ADP is the average daily number of juveniles in detention on any given day within a particular time period.  Juvenile detention systems calculate and submit monthly ADPs; the BOC aggregates the data to compute both quarterly and annual results.

 


The total ADP includes juveniles in county detention facilities or “other detention settings” – i.e., juveniles who receive custody time credit for home supervision, electronic monitoring, or a type of alternative confinement (such as work programs), but who are not confined in a detention facility.

 

 


As Chart 1 illustrates, the total ADP of juveniles in detention in 2002 was 13,659.  This represents a 4.5% decrease in total ADP since 1999.  The total ADP of juveniles has decreased overall since 1999; however, it is important to analyze ADPs relative to the individual categories of juvenile detention and observe trends within each population. 


Facility ADP

 

Juvenile Halls

 


Juvenile halls are county-operated facilities where juveniles are either held pending disposition (pre-disposition), or are serving a court-ordered period of detention (post-disposition).  While the overall ADP of juveniles in detention was well over 13,500 in 2002, the ADP of juveniles confined to juvenile halls was 6,580; this represents 58% of the total population that was confined to detention facilities (juvenile halls and camps).


As illustrated in Chart 2, the ADP for juvenile halls during 2002 was 6,580.  This ADP decreased 417 from 2001 (6%), and decreased 202 since 1999 (3%).  As illustrated by Chart 3, the JDPS has shown that during each calendar year, the ADP is highest during the 2nd Quarter.

 


Camps

 


As illustrated by Chart 4, the ADP for camps has been stable during the four years of the JDPS.  Camp program managers typically have more control over their populations than their juvenile hall counterparts and exercise options to ensure that the population does not exceed the BRC of 5,371.  Over the last four years, the ADP for camps has remained at an average of 85% of capacity.

 


Juveniles in Other Detention Settings

 

During 2002, the ADP of juveniles in other detention settings – i.e., those who are receiving custody time credit, but who are not detained in a facility – was 2,531, 19% of the total ADP. 

 


Chart 5 highlights the breakdown of juveniles in other detention settings during 2002.  The majority of juveniles in other detention settings in 2002 were those on home supervision with electronic monitoring.

Facility Capacity and Need

 

While the number of detained juveniles has decreased for the last two years, facility capacity has increased.  This is due in part to a long-term program of state and federal funding of facility construction projects intended to replace old dilapidated facilities, as well as to increase future capacity.  The average Board Rated Capacity (BRC), or beds that meet Titles 15 and 24 minimum standards, has increased approximately 10% since 1999 in juvenile halls and camps.  Completed construction projects, and those that are underway, will eliminate and replace 2,101 old dilapidated beds and will add a total of 3,288 beds by 2007[2].

 


While beds are available on a statewide basis, the majority of those beds are in camps, and data indicate that there are many individual facilities in the state where there are insufficient beds to accommodate the current population.  Even in a particular facility in which bed space is available, classification and programming restrictions will limit areas within the facility where particular juveniles can be safely housed.  Conventional correctional best practices suggests that facilities must remain between 85-90% of their total capacity in order to accommodate both current population and variation in day-to-day intake and classification needs.  Ideally, leaving a certain number of beds available allows a facility manager to appropriately classify and program the facility population, adjusting for peak population, on any given day.

 


The increase in BRC has been most significant in juvenile halls.  The 1999 juvenile hall BRC was 6,237.  In 2002, the BRC was 7,126, an increase of 14.2%, or nearly 900 beds.   Although the 2002 statewide juvenile hall BRC was 545 over the 2002 ADP, it was 148 under the Highest One Day count.  And, as stated above, conventional correctional best practices strongly suggest that juvenile detention facilities remain at 85 to 90% capacity in order to handle fluctuations in intake and programming needs.  This means that for 2002, California’s statewide juvenile hall capacity was, on average, deficit between 712 and 1,069 beds statewide.

 

In addition to the above, crowding in a juvenile detention facility, as defined by the Welfare and Institutions Code, occurs when a facility exceeds BRC for fifteen or more days during the month.  During 2002, 35 facilities (26% of the total number of juvenile detention facilities) reported crowding conditions.  These 35 facilities housed over 42% of the statewide juvenile detention facility population.  Of the 35 facilities that reported crowding conditions, over half reported crowding conditions for six months or more during 2002.

 

As stated earlier, when assessing the need for bed space, the highest one-day population must be examined.  The highest one-day population illustrates how high the population can swell on any given day; facility managers must be prepared to accommodate peak populations.

 

Based upon recent history, some predict that the ADP will remain constant, or will continue to decrease.  The BOC believes that although recent history needs to be considered, a better predictor of the need for facility space is the size of the state’s at-risk population.  The Department of Finance’s Demographic Research Unit projects that California’s at-risk juvenile population will be nearly 25% larger in 2010 than it was in 2000.  Thus, it is logical to infer that the ADP of juvenile detention systems – and demand for juvenile facility space – will grow proportionally.

 

Average Length of Stay

 

The Average Length of Stay (ALS) for juveniles in juvenile halls was determined using two different methods of data collection and computation.

 

1.      The number of bookings reported for a calendar year was divided by the bed days (equal to the ADP times 365 days) for a calendar year.  The result was the number of bed days required for each booking or ALS.

2.      Each jurisdiction reported to the BOC the ALS of all juveniles released from juvenile hall during each calendar year since 1999.  BOC staff computed the mean ALS of the jurisdiction averages.

 

The BOC is currently analyzing these approaches to determine which of the two methods of estimating ALS is the most reliable and accurate.  To date, both methods have produced estimates that are very close to one another, which lends support to the conclusion that they are accurate and that on average, a juvenile’s stay in a hall lasts about 20 days.


Juvenile Hall Bookings

 


During 2002, there were an average of 9,860 bookings into juvenile halls each month.  Although the average number of bookings per month increased 4.1% from 1999 to 2000, the average number of bookings per month has decreased by 7.5% since 2000, a figure commensurate with the decrease in juvenile hall ADP during that same time.  Chart 7 highlights the average number of bookings per month since 1999.

The decrease in bookings since 2000 is consistent with state and federal data indicating that arrests of persons under 18 have been decreasing, albeit slowly.[3]  Although there is no single explanation for this decline, it coincides with an increase in the number of community-based intervention programs for at-risk youth – efforts that many believe are easing the burden on the ADP of juvenile detention facilities.[4]  This possible correlation will be closely monitored as more JDPS data are collected.

 

Chart 8 illustrates the 2002 percentage of ADP for the various types of bookings that the JDPS monitors.  While the breakdown of these types of bookings has remained stable since 1999, data indicate that the total number of each type of booking has declined.

 

Although the total number of bookings has decreased 7.5% since 2000, the total number of weapons bookings has decreased 5%.  In 2000, 848 juveniles were booked on weapons charges; during 2002, that number declined to 805.  Welfare and Institutions Code (WIC) 777 bookings have also decreased; the total number decreased from 1,915 in 2000 to 1,616 in 2002.

 

WIC 601 bookings continue to comprise the lowest number of bookings; in 2002, 1% of the total bookings were WIC 601 bookings.


 

 




Detainee Characteristics, Mental Health and Behavioral Issues

 

Distribution of Charges

 

The distribution of felony and misdemeanor charges of juveniles in detention will impact the levels of services provided and overall levels of security required in a particular facility.  A greater concentration of juveniles with higher charges requires increased levels of both resources and security in order to ensure safety and stability.

 


During 2002, 64% of the total juvenile detention population was charged with a felony offense.  Since 1999, the total number of detained juveniles charged with a felony has decreased 11.6%, while the total number of misdemeanor juveniles has increased by 8%.  There are early indicators that seem to suggest that, with the increase in intervention and prevention programs and alternatives to placement for higher charged juveniles, more juveniles charged with a felony are being provided alternatives to incarceration and diverted from custody.  Juvenile halls may be experiencing an increase in misdemeanor juveniles as managers have increased flexibility in programming these wards.  This phenomenon will need to be watched closely in order to determine if these early indicators are correct.

Chart 9 illustrates the breakdown of misdemeanor and felony charges in juvenile halls and camps.  Although a decrease in higher charged juveniles appears to be occurring, the fact that more than half of the population is charged with a felony offense suggests that extensive resources continue to be allocated toward security.  Of note, due to the Ricardo M decision, more juveniles are being committed to juvenile hall as a condition of adjudication, rather than being adjudicated to camps, presumably to take advantage of the higher level of security in halls.

Detention Disposition

 

Juvenile halls were originally designed as “pre-disposition” facilities, where juveniles who had not yet received adjudication, but were either a risk to themselves or others, awaited their final disposition.  Juveniles who received a commitment to a county detention facility were generally housed in a camp facility, where juveniles received programming designed for rehabilitation.  Camp facilities exclusively house post-disposition juveniles.  Recent court decisions, and shifts in juvenile justice trends, show a clear increase in the reliance on juvenile halls for post-dispositional placement of juveniles.

 

Examining the distribution of pre- and post-disposition status in juvenile halls enables facility managers to more effectively determine where resources must be allocated.  Typically, pre-disposition juveniles will be assigned to higher-security housing and will participate in programming designed with higher levels of security in mind.  Due to the uncertain result of their impending adjudication, pre-disposition juveniles may be more vulnerable to erratic behavior and propensity for self-harm.  Additionally, juveniles in halls require enhanced staff and security resources when they appear in court and meet with legal advisors. 


 


As shown in Chart 10, the total number of pre-disposition juveniles in halls increased 5.5% from 1999 to 2002.  Additionally, the percentage of pre-disposition juveniles in halls increased from 49% of the total ADP in 1999 to 54% in 2002.

 


Gender of Juveniles in Custody

 


Housing and programming options in juvenile detention facilities must be planned with their populations in mind.  In addition to the level of charge (felony or misdemeanor) and disposition status, facility managers must consider the gender of their population.  Traditionally, males have comprised a greater percentage of the population of the juveniles in detention, and 2002 is no exception.  As illustrated by Chart 11, males comprised 85% of the total juvenile detention ADP in 2002. 

From 1999 to 2002, however, the percentage of male ADP in detention facilities has been decreasing, while the percent of females has been increasing.  The percentage of male ADP has decreased from 87% of the total ADP in 1999 to 85% in 2002. 

 

Camps have experienced the most significant increase in the number of females; from 1999 to 2002, the number of females increased from 369 to 448, a 21.2% increase.  The ADP of females in juvenile halls has increased significantly as well; from 1999 to 2002, the number of females in juvenile halls increased from 1,028 to 1,158, a 12.7% increase. 

 

The ADP of males decreased in all detention options from 1999 to 2002: 5.8% in halls, 2.3% in camps, and 15.2% in other detention settings.  While other detention settings experienced the greatest rate of decrease for males, females decreased as well, by 9.1%. 

 

Age Distribution

 

The age distribution of juveniles in juvenile halls and camps has been fairly stable over the history of the JDPS. According to the most recent data (the 4th Quarter of 2002), the 15-17 age range accounts for 77% of the juvenile hall population and 76.7% of the camp population.  For juvenile halls, the 12-14 age range accounts for the next highest percentage of juveniles at 14.2%, followed by the 18-and-over age range at 8.0%. On average, there are only 17 juveniles under 12 years of age in juvenile halls in California.

 

For camps, the 18-and-over age range accounts for 15.4% of the juveniles, with 8.3% being in the 12-14 age range.  The majority of juveniles in camps are in the 15-17 age range, over 76%.  There are no juveniles under 12 years of age in camps.

 

Critical Identifiers

 

Several characteristics of juveniles in detention facilities are tracked on a quarterly basis via the JDPS.  During 2002, items were added to this list, while others have been modified.  The list now tracks a snapshot number of juveniles committed to juvenile hall (Ricardo M) and juveniles who have been directly filed to adult court (Proposition 21).  Additionally, the number of juveniles who have been hospitalized is now divided into two categories: medical hospitalization versus mental health hospitalization.  It will take several years of data from these identifiers to observe trends.

 

Counties report critical identifier information via the JDPS on a snapshot basis on the 15th day of the last month of each quarter (they gather the data on that day and report it later to us).  Table 1 is a summary of these critical identifiers since 1999.

 

Table 1: Critical Identifiers, Average per Quarter

 

1999

2000

2001

2002

Juveniles awaiting placement

997

1202

929

828

Juveniles awaiting transfer to camp

682

668

653

397

Juveniles awaiting transfer to CYA

139

152

136

164

Juveniles hospitalized outside detention facilities

48

20

28

«

Juveniles detained for 707(b) WIC offenses

1,326

1,023

995

738

Juveniles found unfit per 707.01 WIC

294

206

179

173

Court Commitments to Juvenile Hall

(Ricardo M)

 

 

 

791

Direct Files to Adult Court

 

 

 

88

Hospitalized for Medical Reasons

 

 

 

14

Hospitalized for Mental Health Reasons

 

 

 

20


The number of juveniles awaiting placement per quarter reached its peak in 2000 at 1,202.  Since then, this number has decreased by 374, or 31%.

 

From 1999 to 2002, the number of juveniles per quarter awaiting transfers to a camp decreased by nearly 40%. 

 

In 2002, the average number of juveniles per quarter awaiting transfers to the California Youth Authority (CYA) per quarter was 164.  This represents an increase of 18% since 1999.  This number has fluctuated from quarter to quarter over the years, but has always been well over 100.  

 

As previously mentioned, the variables for measuring the number of juveniles hospitalized outside a detention facility have been modified to separate the number hospitalized for medical reasons versus mental health reasons.  In 2001, an average of 28 juveniles were hospitalized outside of a detention facility.  During 2002, an average of 14 juveniles per quarter were hospitalized for medical reasons, and 20 were hospitalized for mental health reasons. 

 

Juveniles detained for 707 (b) WIC offenses have steadily decreased since 1999, as have juveniles that were found unfit for juvenile court.  Unfit juveniles, however, have not declined as drastically. 

 

The average number of court commitments to juvenile hall was 791 during 2002.  This will be an important identifier to track during the next few years, especially as we monitor the distribution of pre- and post-disposition juveniles in halls.  If court commitments continue to increase, the number of post-disposition juveniles in halls should increase commensurately.

 

2002 will serve as a baseline for data regarding direct files to adult court based upon Proposition 21.  During 2002, an average of 88 juveniles were directly filed to adult court during each quarter.

 

Mental Health Issues

 

Reporting requirements for mental health issues were modified for 2002 in response to our belief that past JDPS data underestimated the need for mental health resources in juvenile detention.  From 1999 through 2001, counties reported the monthly average number of juveniles who were identified as needing mental health services.  For this time period, the JDPS indicated that an average of 15% of the juvenile population required mental health services. 

 

Counties are now required to report the total number of open mental heath cases during each month.  Open mental health cases are defined as an actual open chart or file with the mental health provider, when a juvenile is actively in need of, and receiving, documented mental health care or services.  Open

mental health cases are tangible numbers that mental health providers are able to provide.

 


Chart 12 depicts the average number of open mental health cases during each quarter of 2002.  The average number of open mental health cases per month during 2002 was 3,638, which represents 33% of the detained ADP.  Given the implications of open mental health cases for facility managers, the BOC will monitor this variable for trends.

 


From 1999 through 2001, the JDPS collected data on the number of juveniles on psychotropic medication on a quarterly basis.  Measuring the number of juveniles on psychotropic medication helps to gauge the number of juveniles who access mental health resources, most likely for a prolonged and consistent mental health issue.  In 2002, the JDPS began collecting this information on a monthly basis.

 


Chart 13 illustrates the number of juveniles on psychotropic medications during each quarter in 2002.  The monthly average number of juveniles who were receiving psychotropic medication in 2002 was 1,294, which represents 12% of the detained ADP.  

 

Suicide Attempts

 

The JDPS defines a suicide attempt as an act where a juvenile overtly, either through verbal or physical gestures, displays an intention to take his or her own life.  Based on this overt gesture, staff then determines that an increased level of supervision is necessary as a direct and immediate response to the suicide threat/attempt.  The JDPS does not count those threats/attempts that are not serious and do not require increased levels of supervision.  The total number of suicide attempts each quarter is collected by the JDPS.

 


The rate of suicide attempts in juvenile halls is 27.9 per 1,000, whereas the rate in camps is 3.4 per 1,000.  For every suicide attempt in a camp, there are 8 attempts in juvenile hall.  Juveniles in halls are clearly at a higher risk of suicide.

 


Chart 14 illustrates the average quarterly suicide attempts each year since 1999 in both juvenile halls and camps.  Fortunately, attempts in both types of facilities have been decreasing.  In 1999, for example, there were a total of 1,083 suicide attempts.  In 2002, there were 798 attempts; a decrease of 285 attempts, or 26%, since 1999. 

 

During 2002, there was one suicide in a juvenile hall out of a total 798 attempts.  Although one suicide is one too many, the fact that the rate of suicide is so low is a testament to staff training, preparedness and awareness.

 


Assaults on Staff

 

Juvenile assaults on staff, which result in an additional charge being filed, are reported on a quarterly basis.  As expected, the data show that juveniles in halls commit more assaults than the juveniles in camps.  On a per capita basis, juveniles in halls are 11 times more likely to commit assault than in camps.  There were an average of 138 assaults in halls each quarter during 2002, and an average of 8 in camps.

 

Escapes

 

Escapes from juvenile detention are captured on a quarterly basis.  The JDPS defines an escape as an instance where a juvenile has left custody without authorization.  The definition does not include instances where a juvenile fled custody, returned on his/her own, and no formal action was taken.  Escapes include: fleeing from a detention facility; fleeing from a staff member while outside detention; and, failing to return from a furlough.

 

There were an average of 266 escapes from detention each quarter during 2002.  The majority was from camps, which saw an average of 181 escapes each quarter during 2002.  Most camps employ a less restrictive security design than juvenile halls, and juveniles in camps were 20 times more likely, on a per capita basis, to escape than those in juvenile halls.

 

There was an average of 13 escapes per quarter from juvenile halls and 72 escapes from other detention settings in 2002.  Other detention settings also tend to be less restrictive than juvenile halls, and more frequent escapes are not surprising.

 


Perspective

 

The collection and analysis of four years of data sheds light on several emerging trends in juvenile detention.  The population of detained females, for example, continues to rise, increasing nearly 9% from 2001 to 2002.  The issues associated with female populations, including victimization and health concerns, typically exceed those of male populations.  Facility administrators must plan for proper allocation of resources according to gender, including sufficient housing space for female offenders. 

 

The data for 2002 also reveal that 33% of juveniles in detention facilities have an open mental health case, which also has major resource implications that must be considered by facility managers.  As previously mentioned, the BOC had received feedback from the field indicating that the JDPS was underestimating the actual number of juveniles requiring mental health care.  In response, two new variables were added to the monthly JDPS via an Executive Steering Committee (ESC) comprised of local juvenile detention practitioners and subject matter experts.  These new variables were designed to yield more accurate data relative to the number of juveniles in detention who are receiving mental health services.  Although it is difficult to quantify and measure the actual need for mental health care, the ESC felt that capturing the actual number of mental health cases would add value to the survey by providing a clearer picture of the number of juveniles receiving mental health care, whether it be intensive and ongoing or short-term crisis intervention. 

 

Although, for the second year in a row, the total ADP of juveniles in detention declined, local juvenile detention system administrators predict that the decrease in ADP is a temporary respite, and that ADP will soon be on the rise again.  This perspective is based on the projected growth in the at-risk population as well as the very real possibility that a significant portion of at-risk youth who had previously been diverted from facility detention through intervention programs may begin to add to the ADP.  It is also widely believed that local social service and mental health agencies will be severely impacted by budget cuts, further decreasing the resources available for treatment of at- risk youth and diversion from facility detention. 

 

Although the local juvenile detention system is experiencing a respite in the ADP, facility administrators believe that more beds will be needed in the future, in part because beds that have recently or will soon be coming on line merely allowed facilities to catch up with severe crowding that took place during the late 1990s and early 2000s.  Construction grant projects also enabled administrators to upgrade outmoded and dilapidated beds and infrastructure and to provide higher levels of security and safety to both juveniles and staff. 

 

To ensure that the JDPS remains a vital and user-friendly tool for state and local decision makers, two significant improvements were made during 2002:  On-Line Submission and On-Line Querying.  The majority of JDPS participants now submit their data via the Internet, which has facilitated timely response and improved the accuracy of data before it is aggregated for each quarterly report.  The On-Line Querying system makes the JDPS database available to anyone wishing to access it, in a format that is useful and comprehensible.   Anyone wishing to access the data may do so via the BOC’s website: www.bdcorr.ca.gov.

 

Finally, to further increase the value of the JDPS, the BOC recently convened a workgroup comprised of local facility administrators and managers to review the data, provide a pragmatic analysis of trends, and offer predictions based upon individual jurisdictions’ experience, including regional trends.  The efforts of this workgroup will provide additional perspective on the critical data captured by the JDPS and will be included in future reports.


 

 

 

 

Appendices


 


Appendix A: Juvenile Detention Profile Survey Definitions

 

Assaults on Staff – a minor has physically attacked staff, causing injury or death.  Assaults must result in an incident report or charges filed against the minor.  Assaults include gassing.

 

Average Daily Population (ADP) – the ADP is determined by counting the number of juveniles in custody each day of the month, summing (i.e., adding) the daily counts, and dividing the sum by the number of days in the month.  The resulting value is the ADP.  The daily counts used in the calculation are to be taken at 0600 hours.  All ADP values are to be reported to the first decimal point.

 

Average Length of Stay (ALS) – the ALS is calculated by taking the number of days served by each juvenile released from detention during the quarter, summing (adding) these numbers, and dividing by the number of juveniles who were released.  Length of stay for each individual includes all continuous days served from date of intake until date of release, including any days served during previous reporting periods.

 

Board Rated Capacity (BRC) – the maximum population a facility may have based on the assessment of the Board of Corrections.

 

Booking – any admission into juvenile hall for a law violation or by court order.

 

Direct Files to Adult Court-602(b) and 707(d) WIC: – juveniles who are in the adult court process due to a direct filing pursuant to WIC Section 602 (b) (mandatory) or WIC Section 707 (d) (discretionary).

 

Escapes – a minor who left the control and custody of the juvenile detention facility without authorization.  Includes escaping from the facility, fleeing from a staff member, fleeing from a work assignment, escaping while at court or a medical facility, or failing to return from a furlough.

 

Felony – a crime that is punishable with death or by imprisonment in the state prison, pursuant to Section 17 of the Penal Code.

 

Highest One-Day Count – the date of the month on which the total combined population for all the juvenile halls, camps and “other juveniles in the system” was the highest.

 

Misdemeanor – every other crime or public offense except those offenses that are classified as either a felony or an infraction.  Punishable by imprisonment in the county jail not to exceed 6 months or by fine not exceeding one thousand dollars, or both, pursuant to Sections 17 and 19 of the Penal Code.

Other Detention Settings – refers to “juveniles in alternative confinement programs” who are receiving credit for custody time.

 

One-Day Snapshot – a count of the number of juveniles in the detention facility on a single day of the month.  The time and day to be used for the one-day snapshots are 0600 hours on the 15th of the month.

 

Open Mental Health Cases: the total number of juveniles who have an “open mental health case” with the mental health provider.

 

Pre-Disposition Minor – a juvenile who is awaiting a finding, judgment and disposition by the juvenile court, on alleged criminal charges.

 

Post-Disposition Minor – a juvenile who has received a disposition from the juvenile court.

 

Psychotropic Medication – any prescription medication that influences emotions or behavior.

 

601 Booking – minor booked into the juvenile hall in violation of Section 601 WIC, a status offense (truancy, runaway, curfew violation).

 

777 Booking 602 WIC ward of the court minor booked into the juvenile hall in violation of Section 777 WIC, alleging a violation of a condition of probation, not amounting to a crime.

 

707 (b) Offense – offenses delineated in Section 707 (b) of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

 

707.01 WIC Minor – any minor who has been found as an unfit subject for juvenile court and has been remanded to the adult court, pursuant to Section 707.01 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

 

Status Offenders – minors described in Section 601 of the Welfare and Institutions Code who are habitually disobedient or truant.

 

Suicide Attempt – when a juvenile endeavored to commit suicide as measured by the facility initiating a suicide watch.  A suicide watch is the direct observation of a juvenile who might attempt suicide.  This does not include juveniles identified as suicidal because of notice on admission or prior history. 

 

Weapons Related Offense – an offense in which a minor is booked into juvenile hall for an offense where a weapon was used in the commission of the booking offense.


Appendix B:  Juvenile Facilities by County, Type and Board Rated Capacity (BRC) as of June 31, 2002

 

County

Facility

Type

BRC

Alameda

Alameda County Juvenile Hall

JH

299

 

Alameda Camp Sweeney

Camp

105

 

Alameda Sweeney Transition

Camp

90

Amador

Amador County SPJH

JH

4

Butte

Butte County Juvenile Hall

JH

60

Colusa

Colusa Fouts Springs Boys Ranch

Camp

162

Contra Costa

Contra Costa Juvenile Hall

JH

170

 

Contra Costa Orin Allen Ranch

Camp

100

Del Norte

Del Norte Juvenile Hall

JH

44

 

Del Norte Bar O Boys Ranch

Camp

42

El Dorado

El Dorado County Juvenile Hall

JH

40

Fresno

Fresno County Juvenile Hall

JH

265

 

Elkhorn Camp

Camp

200

Glenn

Jane Hahn Juvenile Hall

JH

8

Humboldt

Humboldt County Juvenile Hall

JH

26

 

Humboldt Regional Center

JH

18

Imperial

Imperial County Juvenile Hall

JH

72

Inyo

Inyo County Juvenile Hall

JH

14

Kern

James G. Bowles Juvenile Hall

JH

100

 

Camp Erwin Owen

Camp

125

 

Crossroads

Camp

116

 

Pathways Academy

Camp

20

Kings

Kings County Juvenile Center

JH

63

 

Kings County Juv. Boot Camp

Camp

45

Lake

Lake County Juvenile Hall

JH

40

Lassen

Lassen County Juvenile Hall

JH

49

Los Angeles

L. A. Central Juvenile Hall

JH

329

 

Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall

JH

408

 

Barry J. Nidorf Juvenile Hall

JH

672

 

L. A. Afflerbaugh

Camp

116

 

Challenger Memorial Youth Center

SPJH

57

 

L. A. Camp David Gonzales

Camp

125

 

L. A. Camp Karl Holton

Camp

125

 

L. A. Camp Jarvis

Camp

110

 

L. A. Camp Kilpatrick

Camp

124

 

L. A. Camp Dorothy Kirby

Camp

100

 

L. A. Camp Louis Routh

Camp

90

 

L. A. Camp McNair

Camp

110

 

L. A. Camp Mendenhall

Camp

105

Los Angeles

L. A. Camp Miller

Camp

115

 

L. A. Camp Munz

Camp

105

 

L. A. Camp Onizuka

Camp

110

 

L. A. Camp Paige

Camp

116

 

L. A. Camp Resnik

Camp

110

 

L. A. Camp Rockey

Camp

125

 

L. A. Camp Scobee

Camp

110

 

L. A. Camp Joseph Scott

Camp

90

 

L. A. Camp Kenyon J. Scudder

Camp

105

 

L. A. Camp Smith

Camp

110

Madera

Juvenile Detention Center

JH

70

 

Juvenile Correctional Camp

Camp

64

Marin

Marin County Juvenile Hall

JH

40

Mariposa

Mariposa Special Purpose JH

JH

4

Mendocino

Mendocino County Juvenile Hall

JH

43

Merced

Merced Juvenile Hall

JH

42

Mono

Mono County SPJH

JH

4

Monterey

Wellington M. Smith Jr. J.H.

JH

114

 

Monterey County Youth Center

Camp

113

Napa

Napa County Juvenile Hall

JH

34

Nevada

Nevada County Juvenile Hall

JH

19

Orange

Orange County Juvenile Hall

JH

434

 

Orange Co. Lacy Juvenile Annex

JH

84

 

Orange Co. Joplin Youth Center

Camp

64

 

Orange Co. Los Pinos Camp

Camp

125

 

Orange Co. Youth Guidance Ctr.

Camp

125

Placer

Placer Juvenile Detention

JH

55

Plumas

Plumas County Juvenile Hall

SPJH

8

Riverside

Riverside Juvenile Hall

JH

219

 

Southwest Juvenile Hall

JH

99

 

Indio Juvenile Hall

JH

163

 

Twin Pines Ranch

Camp

70

 

Van Horn Youth Center

Camp

40

Sacramento

B.T. Collins Juvenile Center

JH

261

 

Sacramento County Boys Ranch

Camp

100

 

Warren E. Thornton Youth Center

Camp

50

San Benito

San Benito County Juvenile Hall

JH

20

San Bernardino

San Bernardino Juvenile Hall

JH

281

 

Kuiper Youth Center

Camp

30

 

Regional Youth Education Facility

Camp

20

 

Camp Heart Bar

Camp

20

 

West Valley Juvenile Hall

JH

22

San Diego

San Diego Juvenile Hall

JH

359

 

Camp Barrett Y.C.C.

Camp

125

 

Campo Juvenile Ranch Facility

Camp

250

 

Girls Rehabilitation Facility

Camp

30

San Francisco

San Francisco Juvenile Hall

JH

132

 

Log Cabin Ranch

Camp

84

San Joaquin

San Joaquin Juvenile Hall

JH

179

 

San Joaquin Probation Camp

Camp

45

San Luis Obispo

SLO County Juvenile Hall

JH

45

San Mateo

San Mateo County Juvenile Hall

JH

163

 

San Mateo Camp Glenwood

Camp

60

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall

JH

56

 

Los Prieto Boys Camp

Camp

56

 

Santa Maria Juvenile Hall

JH

50

 

Tri-County Boot Camp

Camp

40

Santa Clara

Santa Clara Juvenile Hall

JH

496

 

Harold Holden

Camp

108

 

William James Boys Ranch

Camp

96

 

Muriel Wright Center

Camp

71

Santa Cruz

Santa Cruz Juvenile Hall

JH

42

Shasta

Shasta County Juvenile Hall

JH

60

 

Regional Boys Camp

Camp

60

Siskiyou

Siskiyou County Juvenile Hall

JH

24

Solano

Solano County Juvenile Hall

JH

88

 

Solano New Foundations

Camp

30

Sonoma

Sonoma County Juvenile Hall

JH

120

 

Sonoma County Probation Camp

Camp

20

 

Sonoma Co. Sierra Youth Center

Camp

24

Stanislaus

Stanislaus County JH

JH

118

Tehama

Tehama County Wetter JH

JH

20

 

Trinity Juvenile Detention

JH

24

Tulare

Tulare Co. Juvenile Det. Facility

JH

210

 

Tulare County Youth Facility

Camp

132

Ventura

Clifton Tatum Center

JH

84

 

Frank A. Colston Youth Center

Camp

45

 

WERC Camp

Camp

40

Yolo

Yolo County Juvenile Hall

JH

30

Yuba

Yuba/Sutter Juvenile Hall

JH

60

 

Maxine Singer Center Camp

Camp

60

 


 



[1] Data depicted in this report may vary slightly from previously published reports.  Occasionally, errors in historical data are found and corrected.  These changes are relatively rare and have not altered our conclusions regarding trends.  If data have changed, please assume that subsequent data has been submitted and updated, and that the most recent data is the most accurate.

[2] Counties may add additional beds and, conversely, eliminate greater numbers of outmoded or dilapidated beds independent of state grant programs.  These two factors create difficulty in forecasting local juvenile hall and camp capacities that may be more or less than anticipated at the conclusion of the state grant program.

[3] FBI UCR, Arrests by State, 1999-2001/Crime and Delinquency in California, 1999-2001

[4] Final reports from the Challenge Grant I and the Repeat Offender Prevention programs and preliminary reports from the Juvenile Justice and Crime Prevention Act programs. 

« Data is now separated by reasons for hospitalization.